University of Oregon

UO Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology—2010

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Faculty/Staff
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In spring, 2010, the University of Oregon participated in the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research (ECAR) Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, a nationwide survey of college students' use of technology. The charts that follow are the results of this study.

 

 

 

Chart of student mobile use

Chart of students' skill level

Chart of students' digital literacy

Chart that shows what software students use in class

Chart of students' assessment of their instructors' use of technology

<img data-cke-saved-src="/sites/default/files/wysiwyg_imageupload/7/snapshot-engagement-large.png" src="/sites/default/files/wysiwyg_imageupload/7/snapshot-engagement-large.png" class="imgupl_floating_none_left" alt="Students at the University of Oregon clearly believe that using IT in their classes make school more convenient, with 67.4 percent saying the agree or strongly agree with that statement. Students are less confident about whether IT improves learning: less than half (44.5 percent) agree or strongly agree with that statement. And students" assessment="" of="" their="" own="" engagement="" produces="" the="" least="" clarity,="" with="" 33.2="" percent="" students="" agreeing="" or="" strongly="" that="" they="" get="" more="" actively="" involved="" in="" courses="" use="" it.'="">

Nearly 52 percent of UO students said when they entered college they were adequately prepared (those who answered agree or strongly agree) to use IT as needed in their courses, more than the negative and neutral responses combined. Students at universities nationwide answered similarly. Students felt differently, however, when speculating about their preparation for life after college. Only 36.9 percent of UO students feel that the IT they have used in their courses will have adequately prepared them for the workplace. The largest set of UO respondents—44.4 percent—answered "neutral". This raises several questions that are not addressed by the survey: do students feel uncertain about the IT skills they gained in college? Or are they uncertain about what types of IT tasks their future jobs will require of them? How accurate are students